GHGO
Gaited Horse Group of Ontario
(Rocky Mountain, Kentucky Mountain & Spotted Mountain Horse) For many years the Mountain Horse was bred as a calm-tempered, sure-footed, all-round farm horse that could move as easily and as smoothly over rough mountain trails as through an open field. One might say they are a “do it all” kind of horse. They could pull a plow or buggy, work cattle, be ridden bareback by children, or saunter comfortably into town. Mountain Horses are very easy keepers too. Their hardy upbringing and thick winter coats allow them to tolerate our cold Canadian winters with a minimum of food and shelter. Their metabolisms are highly efficient and they don't waste energy on hot or nervous behaviour either.Today, the Mountain Horse is a very popular choice among pleasure riders. There is nothing a Mountain Horse can't do, though they truly excel out on the trail and make the ideal family horse. With their smooth, effortless saddle gait the Mountain Horse is a perfect choice for riders with back, hip or knee injuries and age-related fatigues too. As a result of generations of selective breeding the Mountain Horse posses a natural and inherited ability to perform a smooth, ambling “saddle gait” that glides forward. The Mountain Horse has a 4-BEAT LATERAL gait, in which one can count four distinct hoof beats that produce a cadence of near equal rhythm, just like at the walk. This gait is initiated by the hind leg, and the sequence goes LEFT HIND - LEFT FRONT - RIGHT HIND - RIGHT FRONT. This is a naturally occurring gait, present from birth, that does not require any training aids or action devices, and is extremely comfortable to ride. Mountain Horses can be ridden at varying speeds while maintaining their saddle gait, averaging 5-25 miles per hour. While the speed may vary the four beat rhythm of the gait should always remain constant. The Mountain Horse moves it's feet with minimal ground clearance, and minimal knee and hock action. The gait is highly efficient, using multiple muscles groups simultaneously, allowing the Mountain Horse to cover great distances at high speeds without tiring.Like all breeds of horses the Mountain Horse is capable of performing many gaits. While the saddle gait is the most desired and highly sought after gait, many Mountain Horse owners enjoy cantering their horses too especially while out on the trail!One of the most outstanding characteristics of the Mountain Horse is their incredibly calm, well-mannered, people-oriented dispositions. Because of their amazing temperaments Mountain Horses are easily trained; many veteran horse trainers have remarked how much more quickly Mountain Horses learn and retain knowledge compared to most other horse breeds. Even young, “green” Mountain Horses can be allowed long lay off times between rides without needing “refresher” courses or warm up time to deal “hotness”. Mountain Horses are always willing to learn new things, and relish attention from their owners as they are extremely people-oriented horses. They will do anything and follow you anywhere! Mountain Horses are naturally “thinkers”; when in new or scary situations they take the time to think things through, instead of automatically going in to “fight or flight” mode. This ability combined with their unusually calm temperaments makes them easy to handle in situations where many other horses would “spook” or shy away. While Mountain Horses are slow to mature physically, often taking 4-5 years for full skeletal growth and 5-7 years for full muscular growth, they are very quick to mature mentally. In fact, it is quite common for a 3 or 4 year old Mountain Horse to behave better than a seasoned 10 year old of most other breeds!The Rocky Mountain Horse Association (RMHA) is a not for profit breed-specific horse registry. The RMHA was established in 1986, primarily through the efforts of Rea Swan, to preserve the rapidly declining population of the Rocky Mountain Horse. Between 1986-1989 the RMHA held “open” registrations to register those horses that met the RMHA breed standards for gait, temperament, conformation & colour .The Rocky Mountain Horse stands between 14.2-16 hands; with a medium build; a wide, deep chest; sloping shoulders (ideally with an angle of 45º); the hips should be round and full; the gaskins muscular; the feet are medium sized and in proportion to the body. The head should be of medium size in proportion to the body, with a medium jaws, bold eyes, well shaped ears and a face that is neither dished nor protruding. The neck should be gracefully arched, medium in length and set at an angle to allow natural carriage with a break at the poll. Mountain Horses are also known for their incredibly long, thick, sometimes wavy manes and tails.The Rocky Mountain Horse has a solid body colour, with no white above the knees or hocks, except on the face where only modest amounts are acceptable. Rocky Mountain Horses come in all colours of the rainbow, including silver dapples, creams, roans, champagnes and duns. However, the breed distinction and “crowd favourite” is the chocolate coat colour with a white or flaxen mane and tail.The Kentucky Mountain Saddle Horse Association (KMSHA) is a for profit type-specific horse registry. The KMSHA was formed in 1989 and independently owned by Robert Robertson Jr. The primary purpose of the KMSHA was to register those horses that met the basic RMHA breed standards but were shorter in height (though no upper height limit was set). However, because the KMSHA is a type-specific registry, horses of non-Rocky Mountain Horse breeding may also be registered (eg. Tennessee Walkers). So all RMHA registered horses are eligible to be registered with the KMSHA, but not all KMSHA registered horses are eligible to be registered with the RMHA.The Mountain Pleasure Horse Association (MPHA) is a not-for-profit type-specific horse registry. The MPHA was formed in 1989 by a minority group of RMHA members. The primary purpose of the MPHA was to register those horses that met the basic RMHA breed standards but were taller in height and without the white colour restrictions (white allowed above the knees). However, because the MPHA is a type-specific registry, horses of non-Rocky Mountain Horse breeding may also be registered (eg. Tennessee Walkers). So all RMHA registered horses are eligible to be registered with the MPHA, but not all MPHA registered horses are eligible to be registered with the RMHA.The Spotted Mountain Horse Association (SMHA) is for profit type-specific horse registry owned by the KMSHA. The SMHA was formed in 2002 to register Mountain Horses that had white “spots” that were considered too much coverage for any of the existing Mountain Horse registries. Minimal white spotting caused by the Sabino genes is very common among Mountain Horses, occasionally two RMHA horses with minimal white can produce a foal with a significant amount of white that is ineligible to be registered with the RMHA. However, white spotting patterns such as the Tobiano gene are not native to Mountain Horses and have been introduced to by cross-breeding with Tennessee Walking Horses.The United Mountain Horse Inc. (UMH) is not a breed or type registry, but a not for profit corporation. The UMH was established in 2000 for the purpose of uniting, promoting and exhibiting all Mountain Horses. Mountain Horse Link:  Rocky Mountain Horse Association https://www.rmhorse.com/ Kentucky Mountain Saddle Horse Association http://www.kmsha.com/ Mountain Pleasure Horse Association http://mountainpleasurehorseassociation.com/ Spotted Mountain Horse Association http://www.kmsha.com/smha/index.htm United Mountain Horse Inc. http://unitedmountainhorse.com/home/ 
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(Rocky Mountain, Kentucky Mountain & Spotted Mountain Horse) For many years the Mountain Horse was bred as a calm-tempered, sure-footed, all-round farm horse that could move as easily and as smoothly over rough mountain trails as through an open field. One might say they are a “do it all” kind of horse. They could pull a plow or buggy, work cattle, be ridden bareback by children, or saunter comfortably into town. Mountain Horses are very easy keepers too. Their hardy upbringing and thick winter coats allow them to tolerate our cold Canadian winters with a minimum of food and shelter. Their metabolisms are highly efficient and they don't waste energy on hot or nervous behaviour either.Today, the Mountain Horse is a very popular choice among pleasure riders. There is nothing a Mountain Horse can't do, though they truly excel out on the trail and make the ideal family horse. With their smooth, effortless saddle gait the Mountain Horse is a perfect choice for riders with back, hip or knee injuries and age-related fatigues too. As a result of generations of selective breeding the Mountain Horse posses a natural and inherited ability to perform a smooth, ambling “saddle gait” that glides forward. The Mountain Horse has a 4-BEAT LATERAL gait, in which one can count four distinct hoof beats that produce a cadence of near equal rhythm, just like at the walk. This gait is initiated by the hind leg, and the sequence goes LEFT HIND - LEFT FRONT - RIGHT HIND - RIGHT FRONT. This is a naturally occurring gait, present from birth, that does not require any training aids or action devices, and is extremely comfortable to ride. Mountain Horses can be ridden at varying speeds while maintaining their saddle gait, averaging 5-25 miles per hour. While the speed may vary the four beat rhythm of the gait should always remain constant. The Mountain Horse moves it's feet with minimal ground clearance, and minimal knee and hock action. The gait is highly efficient, using multiple muscles groups simultaneously, allowing the Mountain Horse to cover great distances at high speeds without tiring.Like all breeds of horses the Mountain Horse is capable of performing many gaits. While the saddle gait is the most desired and highly sought after gait, many Mountain Horse owners enjoy cantering their horses too especially while out on the trail!One of the most outstanding characteristics of the Mountain Horse is their incredibly calm, well-mannered, people-oriented dispositions. Because of their amazing temperaments Mountain Horses are easily trained; many veteran horse trainers have remarked how much more quickly Mountain Horses learn and retain knowledge compared to most other horse breeds. Even young, “green” Mountain Horses can be allowed long lay off times between rides without needing “refresher” courses or warm up time to deal “hotness”. Mountain Horses are always willing to learn new things, and relish attention from their owners as they are extremely people-oriented horses. They will do anything and follow you anywhere! Mountain Horses are naturally “thinkers”; when in new or scary situations they take the time to think things through, instead of automatically going in to “fight or flight” mode. This ability combined with their unusually calm temperaments makes them easy to handle in situations where many other horses would “spook” or shy away. While Mountain Horses are slow to mature physically, often taking 4-5 years for full skeletal growth and 5-7 years for full muscular growth, they are very quick to mature mentally. In fact, it is quite common for a 3 or 4 year old Mountain Horse to behave better than a seasoned 10 year old of most other breeds!The Rocky Mountain Horse Association (RMHA) is a not for profit breed-specific horse registry. The RMHA was established in 1986, primarily through the efforts of Rea Swan, to preserve the rapidly declining population of the Rocky Mountain Horse. Between 1986-1989 the RMHA held “open” registrations to register those horses that met the RMHA breed standards for gait, temperament, conformation & colour .The Rocky Mountain Horse stands between 14.2-16 hands; with a medium build; a wide, deep chest; sloping shoulders (ideally with an angle of 45º); the hips should be round and full; the gaskins muscular; the feet are medium sized and in proportion to the body. The head should be of medium size in proportion to the body, with a medium jaws, bold eyes, well shaped ears and a face that is neither dished nor protruding. The neck should be gracefully arched, medium in length and set at an angle to allow natural carriage with a break at the poll. Mountain Horses are also known for their incredibly long, thick, sometimes wavy manes and tails.The Rocky Mountain Horse has a solid body colour, with no white above the knees or hocks, except on the face where only modest amounts are acceptable. Rocky Mountain Horses come in all colours of the rainbow, including silver dapples, creams, roans, champagnes and duns. However, the breed distinction and “crowd favourite” is the chocolate coat colour with a white or flaxen mane and tail.The Kentucky Mountain Saddle Horse Association (KMSHA) is a for profit type-specific horse registry. The KMSHA was formed in 1989 and independently owned by Robert Robertson Jr. The primary purpose of the KMSHA was to register those horses that met the basic RMHA breed standards but were shorter in height (though no upper height limit was set). However, because the KMSHA is a type-specific registry, horses of non-Rocky Mountain Horse breeding may also be registered (eg. Tennessee Walkers). So all RMHA registered horses are eligible to be registered with the KMSHA, but not all KMSHA registered horses are eligible to be registered with the RMHA.The Mountain Pleasure Horse Association (MPHA) is a not-for-profit type-specific horse registry. The MPHA was formed in 1989 by a minority group of RMHA members. The primary purpose of the MPHA was to register those horses that met the basic RMHA breed standards but were taller in height and without the white colour restrictions (white allowed above the knees). However, because the MPHA is a type-specific registry, horses of non-Rocky Mountain Horse breeding may also be registered (eg. Tennessee Walkers). So all RMHA registered horses are eligible to be registered with the MPHA, but not all MPHA registered horses are eligible to be registered with the RMHA.The Spotted Mountain Horse Association (SMHA) is for profit type-specific horse registry owned by the KMSHA. The SMHA was formed in 2002 to register Mountain Horses that had white “spots” that were considered too much coverage for any of the existing Mountain Horse registries. Minimal white spotting caused by the Sabino genes is very common among Mountain Horses, occasionally two RMHA horses with minimal white can produce a foal with a significant amount of white that is ineligible to be registered with the RMHA. However, white spotting patterns such as the Tobiano gene are not native to Mountain Horses and have been introduced to by cross-breeding with Tennessee Walking Horses.The United Mountain Horse Inc. (UMH) is not a breed or type registry, but a not for profit corporation. The UMH was established in 2000 for the purpose of uniting, promoting and exhibiting all Mountain Horses. Mountain Horse Link:  Rocky Mountain Horse Association https://www.rmhorse.com/ Kentucky Mountain Saddle Horse Association http://www.kmsha.com/ Mountain Pleasure Horse Association http://mountainpleasurehorseassociation.com/ Spotted Mountain Horse Association http://www.kmsha.com/smha/index.htm United Mountain Horse Inc. http://unitedmountainhorse.com/home/ 
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